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Physician Grief

Graham Ingalsbe, MD, Rob Orman, MD, and Anand Swaminathan, MD FAAEM
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20:28
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Nurses Edition Commentary

Kathy Garvin, RN and Lisa Chavez, RN
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02:32

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EMRAP 2018 07 July Vol.18 V2 Written Summary 390 KB - PDF

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Katrina J. -

Thank you so very much for this piece. Dr Ingalsbe is so incredibly brave to share his and his wife's story and their experience, especially that of two physicians experiencing unfathomable and sudden loss of life. It touched me deeply. Health care workers in general I think cannot well deal with their colleague's loss. I can count on one hand the number of colleagues, physician, nurse or otherwise, who talked to me either face to face or by any other communication after my sister hanged herself off her apartment balcony two years ago. I abruptly left the country for a week to be with my family. The ED secretary sent me flowers on behalf of the department. On my return to work it was like it had not happened. One ER doc friend from residency who was passing through town a few months later just stared at me and did not say a word when I told her. Another colleague one day came and told me the prurient details of a case of suicide by hanging he had had to deal with earlier in his shift. Of course loss and grief are intensely personal, but for the death of a close family member to go unacknowledged, by the people you work with every day in deeply challenging circumstances, is ultimately quite damaging. A little acknowledgment goes a long way. Reach out to those people, hug them, look them in the eyes, tell them how utterly awful it must be, ask them how they are, how they are sleeping, if they feel they can manage, ask them about who has died and what they were like and what they meant to them. Two years down the line I am still bursting with grief and guilt. While I know it is mine alone to deal with, years of working in an emotional vacuum have not helped. Thank you Dr. Ingalsbe for sharing your story and EM:RAP for recognizing its importance.

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EM:RAP 2018 July Full episode audio for MD edition 229:23 min - 319 MB - M4AEM:RAP 2018 July German Edition Deutsche 120:44 min - 166 MB - MP3EM:RAP 2018 July Spanish Edition Español 90:31 min - 124 MB - MP3EM:RAP 2018 July Australian Edition Australian 35:17 min - 48 MB - MP3EM:RAP 2018 July Canadian Edition Canadian 24:10 min - 33 MB - MP3EM:RAP 2018 July French Edition Français 27:05 min - 37 MB - MP3EM:RAP 2018 07 July Individual MP3 Files 293 MB - ZIPEMRAP 2018 07 July Individual Summaries 742 KB - ZIPEMRAP 2018 07 July Spanish Summary 1 MB - PDFEMRAP Board Review Answers 2018 07 July Vol.18 07 116 KB - PDFEMRAP 2018 07 July Vol.18 V2 Written Summary 390 KB - PDFEMRAP Board Review Questions 2018 07 July Vol.18 07 407 KB - PDF

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