Start with a free trial account for free content every month. Already a subscriber? Sign in.

May Introduction - Hematuria and AAA

Rob Orman, MD and Anand Swaminathan, MD FAAEM
00:00
04:35
Sign in or subscribe to listen

No me gusta!

The flash player was unable to start. If you have a flash blocker then try unblocking the flash content - it should be visible below.

Nurses Edition Commentary

Mizuho Spangler, DO, Kathy Garvin, RN, and Lisa Chavez, RN
00:00
00:13

No me gusta!

The flash player was unable to start. If you have a flash blocker then try unblocking the flash content - it should be visible below.

EM:RAP 2016 May Written Summary 626 KB - PDF

Does that blood in the urine of the elderly man with acute back pain seal the diagnosis of ureteral colic? Probably not.

To view chapter written summaries, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes.

Jim B. -

Dear EM Rappers,

Having just received the sales pitch from the PCT sales person, are there any good studies speaking to its ED utility or lack thereof ? Have serious studies actually verified its mystical ability to differentiate viral and bacterial infections and guide the treatment of sepsis ?
Thanks

Rob O -

Hi Jim,
In the below post, there is a link to the article "Procalcitonin algorithm in critically ill adults with undifferentiated infection or suspected sepsis. A randomized controlled trial"
We will have a segment in the near future addressing your specific question.

If you want the punchline/conclusion of the study... In critically ill adults with undifferentiated infections, a PCT algorithm including 0.1 ng/ml cut-off did not achieve 25% reduction in duration of antibiotic treatment

Bilgehan O. -

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25295709

Bilgehan O. -

i also like this http://emcrit.org/emnerd/the-valley-of-fear/

Jim B. -

Thanks for the synopsis and the suggestion of the two articles, both edifying.

Kevin K. -

Hey EM Rap(pers),

So, I listened to the discussion of abdominal seatbelt signs with great interest. Fascinating stuff. Decided to do a lit search. Seems that seat belt sign on the chest also connotes a higher risk of internal injury.

However, here is my question, one that I have not been able to find an answer:

What EXACTLY constitutes a seatbelt sign?

Now, I'm not talking about the large, deep contusion across the lower abdomen. That is clearly a seatbelt sign. However, my residents are constantly pointing to little, tiny abrasions over bony prominences (most notably the pelvic ASIS and clavicle) and calling it a seatbelt sign in an otherwise normal patient. I'm a pretty strong believer in NOT whole-body CT scanning everyone who has trauma. However, this discussion on seatbelt signs has given me some pause... do I need to increase my scanning? *GASP*

Thanks!

Kevin

To join the conversation, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes and to join the conversation.

To download files, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes.
Snake Bites and The Missed MI Full episode audio for MD edition 256:35 min - 298 MB - M4AEM:RAP 2016 May Aussie Edition Australian 42:06 min - 58 MB - MP3EM:RAP 2016 Mai Résumé en Francais Français 64:00 min - 88 MB - MP3EM:RAP 2016 Mayo Resumen Español Español 78:00 min - 107 MB - MP3EM:RAP 2016 May Canadian Edition Canadian 25:09 min - 35 MB - MP3EM:RAP 2016 May German Edition Deutsche 107:44 min - 148 MB - MP3EM:RAP 2016 May Board Review Answers 172 KB - PDFEM:RAP 2016 May Board Review Questions 159 KB - PDFEM:RAP 2016 May MP3 329 MB - ZIPEM:RAP 2016 May Written Summary 626 KB - PDF

To earn CME for this chapter, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes and earn CME.

0.25 Free AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ certified by Hippo Education

  1. Complete Quiz
  2. Complete Evaluation
  3. Print Certificate

4.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ certified by Hippo Education

  1. Complete Quiz
  2. Complete Evaluation
  3. Print Certificate